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WSWC
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Waterski Canada
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Awards

ATHLETE
COACH
PROVINCE
KRYSTAL ARVISAIS
OFFICAL
VOLUNTEER
HALL OF FAME
Athlete Inductees
Builder Inductees
Pioneer Inductees
MANOO AND GRUJAR SCHOLARSHIP

Inducted Athletes

2011 
Hélène Grégoire
Andy Murdison

2010 
Richard Gray
Karissa Wedd

2009 
Greg Athans
Lisa Long (Sokolowski)

2008 
Jeff Heer
Vailla Hoggan

2007 
Jim Clunie
Karyn Scarpa-Cromwell

2006 
Susi Graham
Kreg Llewellyn

2005 
Kim deMacedo
Bruce Reid

2004 
George Athans
Charles Blackwell
Jeremy Kovak
Beth Leboff
Joel McClintock
Judy McClintock-Messer
Pat Messner 

 

Hélène Grégoire

Hélène started skiing, like many others, at the family cottage near the nation’s capital in her hometown, Gatineau, Québec. Hélène believes her parents are responsible for her athletic accomplishments. Her father, Antoine Grégoire, ran the first water ski competition in the area at Blue Sea Lake. 

She was a member of the national water ski team from 1970 to 1977, winning 10 national titles along the way. She also held Canadian records in girls jump, tricks and slalom, as well as those same records several years later in the wom-en’s category. 

Jumping proved to be one of Hélène’s strong-est events. She won a bronze medal at the 1972 Pan American Championships. She fol-lowed that up the following year, placing fourth at her first World Championship, in Bogota, Columbia, narrowly missing the podium by 6 inches. She also placed 9thoverall at the 73 Worlds. Showing proficiency to ski her best in pressure situations, her two Canadian Open Women jumping records were set at the 1973 and 1975 World Championships. 

Returning to the highest international stage, Hélène solidified herself as one of the top female water skiers in the world. At the 1975 World Champion-ships, she achieved a 5th place finish in jump, and a 6th in overall. Two years later, at the 1977 World Cham-pionships, she made a mark in slalom, earning a 7th place standing, as well as 10th in jump and 13th overall. 

Hélène was inducted into the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame in 1987. After retiring from water skiing, Hélène pursued her career in dentistry in which she has practiced since 1979. She is currently working in a dental office in Gatineau, QC, and is the proud mother of two daughters. 

Awards 

  • 1970 Kiwanis Club Athlete of the Year, Gatineau-Hull 
  • 1970 Won the Jean-Charles Daoust French Canadian athlete of the year trophy 
  • 1971 Quebec Female Athlete of the Year 
  • 1973 Quebec Female Athlete of the Year 
  • 1974 Quebec Female Athlete of the Year 
  • 1975 Quebec Female Athlete of the Year 
  • 1977 Quebec Female Athlete of the Year 
  • 1970-1979 Quebec Athlete of the Decade 
  • 1987 Inducted in the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame 
  • 1992 First woman to be selected as an inductee to the Hull Sports Hall of Fame 
  • 1995 Inducted in Pantheon of Sports Outaouias 

National/International Results 

  • Pan American Championships 1972 Jump Bronze 
  • Can-Am 1976 Jump Gold 

Canadian Records 

Open Women’s

SLALOM 1971 Man and His World Cup 3 @ 14.25 m 1973 Selection Quebec 1 ½ @ 13 m 

TRICKS 1976 Eastern Championship 3480 points (held for 8 years) 

JUMP 1973 Eastern Can-Am 110 ' (33.5 m) 1973 World Championship 111 ' (33.8 m) 1975 World Championship 112' (34.1 m) held for 6 years 

Girl’s

SLALOM 1969 Lac L’Achigan 3.5 @ 16 m 1970 Canadian Championship 6 @ 16 m (held for 11 years) 

JUMP 1969 Lac L’Achigan 97 ' (29.6 m) exceeded Women’s record of the time and was held for 7 years 

Prix

  • 1970 Club Kiwanis Athlète de l’année, Gatineau-Hull
  • 1970 Trophée Jean-Charles Daoust, athlète canadienne française de l’année
  • 1971 Athlète de l’année féminine au Québec
  • 1973 Athlète de l’année féminine au Québec
  • 1974 Athlète de l’année féminine au Québec
  • 1975 Athlète de l’année féminine au Québec
  • 1977 Athlète de l’année féminine au Québec
  • 1970-1979 Athlète de la décennie au Québec
  • 1987 Intronisée au Temple de la Renommée des Sports d’Ottawa
  • 1992 Intronisée au Temple de la Renommée de Hull
  • 1995 Intronisée au Panthéon des Sports de l’Outaouias

Résultats nationaux et internationaux

  • 1972 Championnat des Amériques Saut médaille d’or
  • 1976 Championnat Can-Am Saut médaille d’or

Records Canadiens

Femmes Ouvert
SLALOM 
  • 1971 Coupe Terre des Hommes 3 à 14.25 m
  • 1973 Sélection Québec 1 ½ à 13 m 
FIGURES 
  • 1976 Championnat Est du Canada 3480 points (record a tenu 8 ans)
SAUT 
  • 1973 Eastern Can-Am 110 ' (33.5 m) 
  • 1973 Championnat mondial 111 ' (33.8 m) 
  • 1975 Championnat mondial 112' (34.1 m) record a tenu 6 ans
 
Filles
SLALOM 
  • 1969 Lac L’Achigan 3.5 à 16 m
  • 1970 Championnat Canadien 6 à 16 m (record a tenu 11 ans) 
SAUT 
  • 1969 Lac L’Achigan 97 ' (29.6 m) record a tenu 7 an

Andy Murdison

Andy Murdison was born April 12, 1946 in Toronto, Ontario. He started water skiing five years at the family cottage in Haliburton, Ontario. After its debut at a young age, he took several titles. 

Andy's first foray on the national scene took place in the nationals in 1962 at Lac St-Jean, Quebec. He won the overall title in his first boys national championships. After that, he established the Lake Boshkung Skiers with friends. He became one of the best clubs in the country at that time, with its members winning many titles. The club also hosted the Ontario championships and nationals.
 
In 1965, Andy won a spot on the Canadian team to participate in the skiing world championships in Surfers Paradise, Australia. It was his first year at the University, so with little time to train, he did not as well as he hoped, but he turned that disappointment into motivation. 1966 is when it all began to fall into place for Andy. He participated in the Pan American Championships in Mexico, finishing fifth in the slalom. He and teammate Jean Perrault have spent time training in Mexico that winter Tito Antunano, who later became world champion in slalom. With the world championships scheduled for 1967 take place at home, in Sherbrooke, Quebec, he also led throughout the summer with the national team in Hudson, Quebec, and the site of the world championships. The strategy worked as Andy has improved.
 
He ranked ninth in the combined 10th in trick and eighth in slalom and helped Canada rise much higher in the team standings. He continued his international breakthrough in the ranks. 1968 Pan American Championships in Colombia, he took fourth place in slalom. Andy holds a Canadian record slalom has never been surpassed. It was established in skiing at 38 m / h. The highest speed slalom ski was reduced to 36 m / h in 1966 and the course has been shortened. Andy won four national titles in boys and four national titles in men. It was one of the best international skiers from 1965 to 1969.
 
Andy married his high school sweetheart, Bev. They have two children, Andrew and Tom. who have become excellent wakeboarders and kite surfers.

Richard Gray

Richard Gray competed in barefoot water skiing for 21 years and is being inducted into the Water Ski and  Wakeboard Canada Hall of Fame in the Athlete category. He attended his first organized tournament in 1986  at the Canadian National Barefoot Championships. 

Richard was selected to the Canadian Team and sent to  Germany to represent his country at the World Championships in just his second tournament ever. Richard was a member of the Canadian Team from 1986 through to 2006. He competed in 9 world championships and contributed to the team score each time.  Since his retirement as an athlete, Richard attended the  World Championships as Head Coach of the Canadian  Team in 2006, 2009 and in 2010 led the Team to their  best ever finish in Berlin, Germany, the country where  it all began.

Richard was also very successful on Canadian waters  where he won 22 National Open Men’s medals as well  as numerous medals in his respective age categories.  Richard was also the holder of several National records  and was in the top 3 on the Canadian Rankings list for  15 years.

Richard’s involvement continued through his dedication  to the Barefoot program as Head Coach, Chair of the  Barefoot Committee and Athlete Representative on the  Board of Directors. 

 

Karissa Wedd

Karissa Wedd began water skiing with her family in her hometown of Port Coquitlam, BC. Her brother started competing first, and when she saw how fun it was, she wanted to join in. Karissa’s greatest influence in water skiing is Britta Llewellyn, as she looks up to her physical and mental strengths. According to Karissa, her greatest strengths are staying positive, and always seeing the brighter side of things.

Karissa was on the National Water Ski Team for 5 years competing in jump and slalom. Her career highlights include a fifth place finish in jump at the 2003 World Championships, becoming the Pan American Games Jump Champion and jump record holder in 2003, a bronze medal in jump at the 2002 Pan American Championships, becoming the Jr. Masters Jump Champion in 1999, becoming the Jr. Girls Jump Champion at the 1998 Junior World Championships as well as the Jr. Girls Jump Champion at the 1998 Pan Am Championships.

Karissa was also the Canadian Open Women jump record holder from 2000-2003 as well as the Girls 3 Canadian jump record holder from 1996-1999.

National and International Results

• 5th – 2003 World Championships in Jump

• 2003 Pan American Games Jump Champion

• 2003 Pan American Record Holder

• 3rd - 2002 Pan American Championships in Jump

• 2000-03 Canadian Open Jump Record Holder

• 1999-00 Jr. Masters Jump Champion

• 1999 Jr. Girls Jump Champion – America’s Challenge

• 1998 Jr. Girls Jump Champion – Jr. World Championships

• 1998 Jr. Girls Jump Champion – Pan Am Championships

• 1996-1999 Girls 3 Canadian Jump Record Holder

Records

• Pan American Region Open Women Jump Record Holder – 2003

• Canadian Open Women Jump Record Holder – 2000-03

• Canadian Women 1 Jump Record Holder – 1999-03

• Girls 3 Jump Record Holder 1998-02

• B.C. Jr. Girls Jump Record Holder 1997-03

• B.C. Women 1 Jump Record Holder – 1999-03

Greg Athans

Greg placed fourth overall in the 1977 World Championships in Milan while helping Canada finish third in the team standings. In addition he won 8 National

water ski titles and was the first athlete to ever win a gold medal in both the Canada Summer and Winter Games. Greg Athans was also one of the pioneers of Freestyle Skiing where he won four World Overall titles, two Mogul titles, one Ballet title, 20 World Cup events and 4 cars in one weekend on the Chevy Tour. His tireless promotion of the sport helped launch Freestyle Skiing into the Olympics in 1988. 

Following his sporting career Greg became a sought after coach and professional photographer. He also helped raise more than $150,000 for the B.C. Children’s

Hospital with his annual charity ski camp at Whistler. In the words of Olympic Champion Nancy Greene, “ Greg was like a pebble in the pond, those close to the first ripple were indeed fortunate, yet as the ripples expanded, he continued to touch and influence a vast network of friends, colleagues and competitors.”

With this induction Greg now becomes a member of both the Water Ski and Wakeboard Canada and Canadian Ski Halls of Fame. 

Lisa Long (Sokolowski)

Lisa Long, formerly Lisa Sokolowski was one of Canada’s prominent water ski athletes in the late 1970’s to early 1980’s. She was a member of the Canadian National Water Ski Team from 1978 to 1982, where she compiled numerous records and performances for Canada.

Long came first overall at the Canadian Water Ski Championships numerous times beginning in 1975, again in 1978 and finally in 1982. Her most notable Canadian result came at the 1977 Canada Games where she finished 1st in the Slalom and 3rd in Tricks on her way to the Overall Title.  In addition to her success within Canada, Lisa was chosen to represent Canada at the Pan American Water Ski Championships three times; in 1978, 1980 and 1982. Her best Pan Am performance came in 1980 where she finished fourth overall, with a fifth place finish in slalom and fourth place in both tricks and jump. 

Lisa will always be remembered as a team leader, an incredible athlete and a great competitor.

Jeff Heer

Jeff Heer is one of the most important Canadian wakeboarders in history. Not only was he a pioneer as a rider but he has also made a huge impact on the Canadian wakeboard scene as a coach and mentor to younger  Canadian wakeboarders like Chad Sharpe, Kevin Henshaw, Aaron Rathy, and Rusty Malinoski. 
Getting his start in water skiing, Jeff was setting records in B.C. at the age of 13. He became a member of the  Canadian Junior National Water Ski team, competing at the Junior Worlds in 1992, and dreamt one day of  becoming a member of the Canadian Senior National  Water Ski team. Instead, he followed in the footsteps of  fellow Canadian water skier, Jeremy Kovak in crossing  over to the up and coming sport of wakeboarding. 1994 marked Jeff’s first full year on the pro wakeboard  tour where he finished 4th at the U.S. Masters, 2nd at one of  the pro tour stops, and 1st at the World Wakeboard  Championships. He also had many top 10 finishes at other events during the same year. 
 
Throughout his wakeboard career Jeff put up consistent  performances and was a familiar face at all the pro tour stops, the U.S. and Canadian Masters, Wakestock where he  was the first ever champion, as well as the Canadian Nationals where he became the first ever Canadian  Champion. 
‘’I’m super stoked about the induction,’’ said Heer, who  currently works in national water ski and wakeboard distribution in Vancouver. ‘’It was a real thrill to be part 
of the sport in its infancy and to help it evolve to the point  to where it is becoming more and more mainstream around  the world.’’ 
 
Although Jeff made quite an impact as a rider and a  competitor he is most revered for his efforts behind the  scenes as coach, mentor and sponsor to up and coming  Canadian wakeboarders. Stories of Jeff focusing on the development of future wakeboarding stars over all else run rampant throughout the wakeboard community and attest 
to his lifelong commitment to the sport.

Career Highlights 

- 1st ever Canadian Wakeboard Champion 
- 1st ever Wakestock Champion 
- 1996 World Champion  

National and International Results

1997 US Masters 7th 
1996 World Wakeboard Championships 1st
1996 Pacific Wakeboard Championships 4th
1996 US Open 3rd
1996 Pro Tour – 1st Marine World, CA 
1996 Pro Tour – 3rd Indianapolis, IN 
1996 Pro Tour – 5th Portland, OR 
1996 Pro Tour – 5th Shreveport, LA 
1996 US Masters 7th
1996 US Open 3rd
1995 Pro Tour – 4th boat, 1st seadoo Orlando, FL 
1995 Pro Tour – 2nd boat, 3rd seadoo High Point, NC 
1995 Pro Tour – 6th boat Shreveport, LA
1995 Pro Tour – 2nd boat, 2nd seadoo Detroit, MI 
1995 World Wakeboard Championships 1st seadoo, 3rd boat
1995 US Masters 6th
1995 US Open 1st
1994 Pro Tour – 6th Orlando, FL 
1994 Pro Tour – 5th Phoenix, AR 
1994 Pro Tour – 4th Minneapolis, MN 
1994 Pro Tour – 2nd St. Louis, MO 
1994 World Wakeboard Championships 1st seadoo, 5th boat1994 US Masters 4th

Vailla Hoggan

Vailla Hoggan began competing in the sport of  water skiing at a young age. By age 12 she had  already won her first provincial title and by age 13, her first national championship. Hoggan was a  dominant player in national women’s water skiing  for a full decade as proven by her six straight overall national championship titles between 1964 and 1969. 

Her illustrious water skiing career included many Canadian titles. In 1968, Vailla finished first in women’s tricks at the Canadian Nationals, earning herself a Canadian record. Also in 1968, Hoggan became the first Canadian woman to win gold in slalom at the Pan American Championships in Bogota, Columbia. 

As a result of her provincial, national and international results, many people and many organizations have celebrated her accomplishments. In 1969 Hoggan was recognized as Western Manitoba’s Athlete of the Year and was named as a honourary citizen of Minnedosa, Manitoba. One year later she was named Life Member of the Minnedosa Mallards Water Ski Club and became the first female executive member as Treasurer of the Canadian Water Ski Association. As a culmination of her life-long accomplishments, Hoggan was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 2007

At 22, Hoggan retired from the sport of water skiing to pursue her education. She became a teacher and worked, as a teacher and counsellor in the Winnipeg School Division for a number of years. After serving as administrator in several schools, she finished her career as the principal of Daniel McIntyre Collegiate Institute, retiring in December 2002. 

Career Highlights 

- First female Canadian to win gold – Group 1 (Pan Am) Championships 1968 

- Six-time Canadian Overall Champion 1962, 1964-1968 

- Six-time Manitoba Open Overall Champion 1961-1965, 1970 

- Four-time Manitoba Closed Overall Champion 1960, 1962-1964 National and International Results

- 1961 Canadian Nationals 3rd overall 

- 1962 Canadian Nationals 1st overall 

- 1964 Canadian Nationals 1st overall (junior and women’s) 

- 1965 Canadian Nationals Closed 1st overall 

- 1965 Canadian Nationals Open 2nd slalom, 3rd tricks 

- 1966 Canadian Nationals 1st overall 

- 1966 Group 1 Championships 3rd jump, 4th slalom and overall 

- 1967 World Team Trials 1st overall 

- 1967 World Championships 10th overall 

- 1968 Canadian Nationals 1st tricks, 2nd slalom and jump 

- 1968 Group 1 Championships 1st slalom, 3rd overall 

- 1969 Canadian Nationals Closed 3rd overall 

- 1969 World Team Trials 1st overall 

- 1969 World Championships 8th tricks and jump, 11th slalom

Canadian Records 

Record Holder for Open Women: 

- 1967, Tricks – 2611 points, 1967 National Championship 

- 1968, Jump – 29.3m (96’), 1968 Quebec Open 

- 1969, Slalom – 5 @ 24’ off, 1969 Ontario Open 

 

Jim Clunie

Jim Clunie’s history in the sport of water ski has been extensive. As a jump specialist, Clunie was a member of the National Team and competed at many prestigious international tournaments, including several World Championships and Pan American Games and Championships. He helped team Canada to four team world championship medals including gold in 1991 and 1993. He also won an individual bronze in jump at the 1993 and 1997 worlds and posted fourth place finishes at both the 1995 and 1999 Pan Am Games. 

Clunie has made a recognizable name for himself in the water ski community. Away from his status as a competitive athlete, he has involved himself in other areas within the sport such as being a member of tournament and training camp organizing committees and currently as chair of Water Ski and Wakeboard Canada’s National Team Development Committee. 

Beyond his titles as an athlete and committee member, Clunie bestowed a level of respect, determination and integrity on the sport. His coaches, teammates and international athletes have all referred to him as “the little man with a big heart” – a man who believes that values, fair play, family and nationalism are of the utmost importance. He never overlooked the volunteers who worked behind the scenes, always extending them his acknowledgement and gratitude. 

“Jim is the most enthusiastic team player we have had in my 27 years on the team,” said National Team head coach Steve Bush. “And on top of that, he proved time and time again that he was one of the top jumpers in the world.” 

‘’I’m a bit surprised to receive this great honour,’’ said Clunie, who currently runs two businesses in his hometown. ‘’The highlight for me was the world team title in 1991: no one had ever beaten the U.S., before. The whole experience with the national team was fun and unique. We all grew up together and we had a lot of pride. I try to stay involved as much as I can, the sport for me, is a passion.’’ 

Clunie remains one of the most respected skiers in Canada. His passion for life and for the sport makes him an exemplary person and athlete who always leads by example. 

Karyn Scarpa-Cromwell

Scarpa-Cromwell established herself as a trailblazer in barefoot water skiing. She was a member of the National Barefoot Team for many years and is a seven time National Open Champion. She still holds all three Canadian records in the Women 1 divison, and 2 in the Open Women division. On the international scene she placed 6th in all 4 events at the 1988 World Barefoot Championships and won three medals at the 1992 world championships including silver in the overall and helping Canada to a best-ever third in the team event. 

To this day, she is the only Canadian barefoot worlds overall medalist. Scarpa-Cromwell also took home a Gold Medal in jump at the 2003 Sr. World Championships. 

Karyn has served on the WSWC Barefoot Committee, was a member of the Pan Am Barefoot Council and the World Barefoot Council. 

“It’s great to be recognized for all the hard work I put into the sport,” said Scarpa-Cromwell, who now resides in Lakeland, Florida. “It was a great experience and I’ve encouraged my kids to get involved in sports at a high level and get that satisfaction of working hard for a goal and reaching it.”

National Results

SLALOM TRICKS JUMP OVERALL 

1987 Canadian Nationals 1st

1988 Canadian Nationals 1st

1989 Canadian Nationals 1st

1990 Canadian Nationals 1st

1991 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Open 1st

1998 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Open 1st

1987 Canadian Nationals 1st

1988 Canadian Nationals 1st

1989 Canadian Nationals 1st

1990 Canadian Nationals 1st

1991 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Open 1st

1988 Canadian Nationals 1st

1989 Canadian Nationals 1st

1990 Canadian Nationals 1st

1991 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Nationals 1st

1998 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Nationals 1st

1987 Canadian Nationals 1st

1988 Canadian Nationals 1st

1989 Canadian Nationals 1st

1990 Canadian Nationals 1st

1991 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Nationals 1st

1995 Canadian Open 1st

1998 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Open 1st

2000 Canadian Open 1st

1998 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Nationals 1st

2000 Canadian Open 1st

Canadian Records 

WOMEN 1 

SLALOM 

8.9pts, 1989 

TRICKS 

1390pts, 1990 

WOMEN II 

SLALOM 

9.3 Pts., 1998 

TRICKS 

1810pts, 1998 

JUMP 

13.5 Meters, 1992 

WOMEN III 

TRICKS 

1260 Pts, 2003 

JUMP 

12.8 Meters, 2003 

OPEN WOMEN 

SLALOM 

9.3pts, 1998 

TRICKS 

1810pts, 1998 

Susi Graham

Susi Graham was a slalom specialist and a member of Team Canada’s 1999, 1993 and 1991 World Championship gold medal teams. Her individual successes are highlighted by four World Championship medals, three bronze and one silver, five U.S. Masters titles, five U.S. Open titles; two World Cup titles and two World Professional Championship titles. At four times in her career she held the World Record and is still the current Canadian Record holder.

Family was an important aspect of her success and during the early years, her parents and brothers and sisters were always there to offer support and encouragement. Susi’s father Wes was her biggest fan and was always there to greet her when she came out of the water, regardless of her performance. Whether she won or lost, her professional approach to the sport earned the respect of her peers around the world. She has been a true ambassador for the sport of water skiing and for Canada.

"I don't know what to say,” said Susi about her induction, “It’s great to [be inducted] at the same time as Kreg [Llewellyn]."

National and International Results

1999 World Championships 2nd 
1999 Pan-Am Games 2nd 
1999 World Championships team 1st 
1999 Masters Champions 
1998 World Cup Champion 
1998 World Cup Moscow Champion 
1998 US Masters Champion 
1998 Moscow Open Champion 
1998 British Masters Champion 
1997 British Masters Champion 
1997 World Cup Champion 
1997 World Cup Melbourne 3rd 
1997 Arena Masters 3rd 
1997 US Masters Champion 
1997 US Open Champion 
1996 Canadian Open Champion 
1995 World Championships 3rd 
1995 Pan-Am Games 2nd 
1993 World Championships team 1st 
1993 World Championships 3rd 
1992 Canadian Open Champion 
1991 World Championships team 1st 
1991 Canadian Open Champion 
1989 World Championships 3rd 
1987 Canadian Open Champion 
1986 Canadian Open Champion

Canadian and International Records

 

Canadian Records

WOMEN 1 
SLALOM 
1@10.75m, 1995

WOMEN II 
SLALOM 
4@10.75m, 1998

OPEN WOMEN 
SLALOM 
4@10.75m, 1998

IWSF World Records 
(at 55mph) 
1995 - 3.00@10.75 
1994 - 2.25@10.75 
1993 - 2.00@10.75 
1990 - 1.00@10.75

World Tournament Championship Records - Women Slalom 
(at 55mph) 
1991 - 2.50@11.25 - World Championships - Villach, Austria

 

Kreg Llewellyn

Kreg Llewellyn got an early start to his water ski career when he frequented Sylvan Lake with his family. At age 6 he entered a tournament and the rest is history. Kreg is one of Canada’s most successful skier’s of all time. Known for his strength in Jump and for his mastery in Tricks, he was a dominant force on the water ski circuit for over 20 years. Kreg’s first year on the National Team was 1984 and his brilliant skiing played an important role in the team’s World Championship titles in 1991, 1993 and 1999. 

Despite being plagued with several injuries over the years, Kreg still managed to win three medals at the 1991 World Championships in Austria, equaling the best-ever performance of 3 medals at a worlds for any Canadian. He is a 2 Time World Overall Silver Medalist, a World Slalom Medalist, U.S. Masters Trick Champion, 2 Time U.S. Open Overall and Trick Champion, and a Moomba Masters Overall and Trick Champion. Kreg currently holds 24 Canadian National Records in all three water ski events.

“It’s something you don’t think about in your competitive years but it is sure nice to get that recognition,” said Llewellyn, whose younger brother Jaret is currently one of the biggest stars in the sport. “It’s a great opportunity to thank everyone that helped you along the way. Water skiing can be an individualistic sport so for me my fondest memories are winning the world team titles for Canada.”

National/International Results

SLALOM TRICKS JUMP OVERALL 

1999 Worlds Championships 3rd 

1996 Pan American Championships 1st

1995 IOC Pan American 

Championships 2nd

1992 Canadian Championships 6th

1992 Pan Am Championships 2nd 

1990 Pan Am Championships 2nd 

1989 Canadian Championships 1st 

1992 Canadian Championships 2nd

1992 U.S. Masters 1st

1992 OzSki 1st 

1991 World Championships Austria 3rd 

1990 U.S. Open 2nd 

1989 Canadian Championships 1st 

1989 U.S. Open 1st 

1988 Pan Am Championships 1st 

1988 U.S. Open 1st 

1988 MoombaMasters 1st 

1986 Pan Am Championships 1st

1995 Canadian Championships 1st

1992 Canadian Championships 2nd 

1992 Pan Am Championships 2nd 

1992 OzSki 3rd 

1991 World Championships Austria 3rd 

1990 Pan Am Championships 2nd 

1989 Canadian Championships 1st 

1989 Coors Tour/Vallejo 3rd

1988 Pan Am Championships 2nd

1999 Worlds Championships 3rd 

1997 Worlds Championships 2nd

1996 Canadian Nationals 1st 

1995 Canadian Championships 1st

1995 World Championships 3rd

1992 Canadian Championships 2nd 

1992 Pan Am Championships 4th 

1991 World Championships Austria 2nd 

1989 Canadian Championships 1st 

1989 U.S. Open 1st 

1988 Pan Am Championships 1st 

1986 Pan Am Championships 1st

Canadian Records 

Juvenile Boys TRICKS 

1979 Western Championship 3130 points 

1980 Western Championship 4640 points 

1981 Supreme Record Capability 5640 points 

Boys III 

TRICKS 

1982 Western Championship 6180 points 

1983 Eastern Championship 6240 points 

1984 Canadian Masters 7960 points 

1984 Group I Championship 8250 points 

JUMP 

1983 Western Super Stars 40.8 m (133’10”) 51 kph 

Men I 

SLALOM 

(58 kph boat speed) 

1988 Thrilla in Hydrilla 5 @ 11.25 m (53 buoys) 

TRICKS 

1986 Canadian Masters 8390 points 

1986 Group I Championship 8510 points 

1986 National Championship 8910 points 

1987 World Championship 8970 points 

1987 World Championship 9270 points 

1988 Alberta Championship 9720 points 

1989 World Championship 9820 points 

JUMP 

1988 Pan-Am Championship 55.7 m (183’) 

1989 Hall of Fame 58.7 m (192’5”) 

Men II 

TRICKS 

1995 National Championship 9190 points 

JUMP 

(57 kph) 

1995 World Championship 55.4 m (181’ 9”) 
 

Kim deMacedo

Kim de Macedo has skied competitively since 1983. Her career accomplishments are extensive, capturing may national and international titles between 1988 and 2000. After her competitive run, her interest in athletics extended to her work in the field of Health Science.

Kim proved to be a major force on the 1993 National Team that claimed the gold medal at the World Championships held in Singapore. She won gold in the women’s jump event while placing 2nd overall. Other notable performances include placing 1st overall at the 1993 U.S. Open, placing 1st in tricks and overall at the 1992 Pan Am Championships, and placing 1st in slalom, trick and overall at the 1992 International Water Ski Classic. In 1991, Kim was named by the Sports Federation of Canada, as athlete of the month.

Kim currently resides in Victoria, British Columbia where she works as an Application Analyst at the Vancouver Island Health Authority. Upon graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Information Science from the University of Victoria, Kim gained experience working in health informatics in government and private industry.

National/International Results

SLALOM TRICK JUMP OVERALL

1999 Canadian Championships 1st 
1998 Canadian Championships 1st 
1997 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Alburg Classic 3rd 
1994 Canadian Championships 1st 
1993 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Pan Am Championships 3rd 
1992 International Water Ski Classic 1st 
1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
1988 Pan Am Championships 1st (Junior) 
1988 Junior National Championships 1st 
1988 World Championships 1st (Junior)

2000 Canadian Championships 1st 
1999 Canadian Championships 1st 
1998 Canadian Championships 1st 
1997 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Alburg Classic 2nd 
1994 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Moomba Masters 2nd 
1994 OzSki 1st 
1993 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Pan Am Championships 1st 
1992 International Water Ski Classic 1st 
1990 Canadian Championships 1st 
1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
1988 Pan Am Championships 2nd (Junior) 
1988 Junior National Championships 1st 
1988 World Championships 2nd (Junior)
1998 Canadian Championships 1st 
1997 Canadian Championships 1st 
1996 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Alburg Classic 3rd 
1994 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Moomba Masters 3rd 
1994 OzSki 3rd 
1993 Canadian Championships 1st 
1993 World Championships 1st 
1992 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Pan Am Championships 2nd 
1990 Canadian Championships 1st 
1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
1989 Can/Am 1st (Junior) 
1988 Pan Am Championships 3rd (Junior) 
1988 Junior National Championships 1st 
1988 World Championships 3rd (Junior)
1999 Canadian Championships 1st 
1998 Canadian Championships 1st 
1997 Canadian Championships 1st 
1994 Canadian Championships 1st 
1993 US Open 1st 
1993 Canadian Championships 1st 
1993 World Championships 2nd 
1992 Canadian Championships 1st 
1992 Pan Am Championships 1st 
1992 International Water Ski Classic 1st 
1990 Canadian Championships 1st 
1989 Canadian Championships 1st 
1989 World Games 1st 
1989 Can/Am 1st (Junior) 
1988 Pan Am Championships 2nd (Junior) 
1988 Junior National Championships 1st 
1988 World Championships 2nd (Junior)

 

 

Canadian Records

JUVENILE GIRLS 
SLALOM 
1985 Canada Games (co-holder) 2.5 @ 14.25m (44.5 buoys) 
1986 World Junior Championship 2.5 @ 13.0m (50.5 buoys)

JUMP 
1986 Canadian Masters 25.8m (84’8’’) 45 kph 
1986 Western Championship 26.5m (86’11’’) 45 kph 
1986 National Championship 29.2m (95’9’’) 45 kph 
1986 Superchamps 30.1m (98’9’’) 45 kph

GIRLS III 
SLALOM 
1989 All Star Championship 3.5 @ 12m (45.5 buoys) 
1989 World Championships 1 @ 11.25m (49 buoys) 
1988 Junior Pan Americans 2.5 @ 12m (44.5 buoys) 
1987 Junior Team Trials (co-holder) 2 @ 12m (44 buoys)

TRICKS 
1989 World Games 5930 points

JUMP 
1989 Canadian Team Trials 34.8m (114’)

 

Dr. Bruce Reid

Bruce Reid has had a long history in the sport of water skiing. Along with many championship titles as a water skier, he has also won several provincial titles as a barefoot water skier. His passion for athletics later extended to his chosen profession as an Orthopedic Surgeon.

Bruce obtained his first National title at the age of 9 at the Canadian Championships in the tricks event, in what was then-called the Neophyte Boys division. Nineteen years later in 1984, he continued claiming the tricks title in the Open Men’s division. As a member of the National Team, Bruce competed at 6 World Championships and 6 Pan American Championships. During his career, he competed in a total of 19 Canadian Championships and was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

Even though he no longer competes at the National level, Bruce continues to be active in the sport. His involvement has resulted in his being presented with several awards, such as the Outstanding Achievement Award from the City of Winnipeg and the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal for his contribution to the development of the sport. He currently assists in various activity courses in aquatics and tennis while pursuing his career as a Medical Doctor.

Awards

  • Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal for outstanding contribution to the development of the sport on a national level
  • Outstanding Achievement Award from the City of Winnipeg
  • Inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 1986

National/International Results

 

SLALOM

TRICK

JUMP

OVERALL


1965 Canadian Championships 3rd (Neophyte Boys) 
1970 Canadian Championships 1st (Junior Boys) 
1971 Canadian Championships 2nd (Boys) 
1972 Canadian Championships 2nd (Boys) 
1977 Canadian Championships 2nd
1979 Canadian Championships 2nd
1982 Canadian Championships 3rd


1973 South African International Games 2nd 
1973 South African National Championships 2nd 
1974 Mexican Invitational International Championships 2nd 
1975 California International Cup 1st 
1980 Pan American Championships 4th 
1973 World Championships 6th 
1975 World Championships 10th 
1977 World Championships 9th 
1981 World Championships 11th 
1965 Canadian Championships 1st (Neophyte Boys) 
1970 Canadian Championships 1st (Junior Boys) 
1978, 1981 &1983 Canadian Championships 1st

1973 South African International Games 3rd 
1973 South African National Championships 1st 
1974 Mexican Invitational International Championships 3rd 
1979 Merc Cruiser International Ski Jump Classic 2nd 
1980 World Cup Competition 3rd 
1980 Pan American Championships 2nd 
1980 British Masters 3rd 
1982 French Masters 2nd 
1977 World Championships 4th 
1979 World Championships 3rd 
1970 Canadian Championships 1st (Junior Boys) 
1976–1979, 1981–1984 Canadian Championships 1st

1973 South African International Games 3rd 
1973 South African National Championships 2nd 
1980 Pan American Championships 3rd 
1980 British Masters 3rd 
1973 World Championships 8th 
1975 & 1977 World Championships 7th 
1979 World Championships 11th
1981 World Championships 6th 
1983 World Championships 10th
1970 Canadian Championships 1st (Junior Boys) 
1976 & 1980 Canadian Championships 2nd 
1978, 1981-1983 Canadian Championships 1st
 

 

Canadian Records

JUVENILE BOYS 
SLALOM 
1970 Canadian Championships 0.5 @ 16 off

Tricks 
1970 Canadian Championships 2997 points

BOYS III 
Tricks 
1974 Canadian Championships 4910

MEN I 
Tricks 
1974 Canadian Championships 5030

Jump 
1977 Western Championships 169’ (51.5) 
1978 Group 1 Championships 170’ (51.8m) 
1979 World Championship 172’11” (52.6m) 
1980 British Masters 179’ (54.45m) 
1981 K.P. British Masters 179’6” (54.7m) 
1981 World Championships 182’1” (55.5m)

OPEN MEN

Tricks 
1972 Championship Americas 4000 points (Raw) 
1977 Western Championship 5220 points

Jump 
1974 Canadian Championship 169’ (51.5m) 
1978 Group 1 Championship 170’ (51.8m) 
1979 World Championship 172’11” (52.6m) 
1980 British Masters 179’ (54.45m) 
1981 K.P. British Masters 179’6” (54.7m) 
1981 World Championship 182’1” (55.5m)

MEN II 
Tricks 
1983 Liz Allan Superstars 6050 points 
1983 Canadian championships 6650 points

MEN III 
Jump 
1999 Canadian Championships 50.5m (165’8”)

George Athans

George Athans learned some valuable lessons from his numerous triumphs in international water skiing, skills he would use to develop a successful career in television.

''Winning those world titles taught me a lot about hard work, time management, setting and reaching personal goals and also a sense of fair play,'' said Athans. ''Those are things I use daily in my career today. ''Athans became famous in Canada in the early 1970's earning the overall titles at the 1971 and 1973 world water skiing championships, the first Canadian world champion in the sport since Charles Blackwell in 1953 and only the third ever, at the time, to win consecutive world crowns.

He was bestowed with awards and honours soon afterwards including induction into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1971Canada Sports Hall of Fame in 1974 and received the Order of Canada, also in 1974.

He was on the national team from 1966 to 1974. He broke 28 Canadian records in his career and won 10 consecutive national titles. Athans says that being among the first inductees into Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada's Hall of Fame is a thrill.

''I'm honored to be recognized among such a select group of outstanding Canadian skiers,'' he said. ''I'm amazed at how well Canada has done in world competition. Few sports have achieved so much success. If I have inspired any of those skiers that followed me then I'm very proud.''

Since his retirement, Athans has managed a successful television career. He kept a high public profile as a sports reporter for CBC Television in Montreal for many years. He still works in the TV business today as an award-winning producer and director.

 

Career Highlights

  • 1971 - Overall Champion at World Championships
  • 1973 - World Slalom Champion
  • 1973 - World Best Single Round Score, Slalom
  • 1973 - World Overall Champion
  • 28-time Canadian record holder
  • 10-time consecutive Canadian champion (1965 - 1974)
  • 9-year member of the National Water Ski Team (1966-1974)

Awards

  • 1971 British Columbia Athlete of the Year
  • 1971 Named to Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame
  • 1972 Canadian Amateur Athlete of the Year
  • 1973 Canadian Amateur Athlete of the Year
  • 1973 Quebec Athlete of the Year
  • 1974 Named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame
  • 1974 Named to ORDER OF CANADA
  • 1980 Inducted to Quebec Sports Hall of Fame
  • 1993 Inducted to the International Water Ski Federation Hall of Fame

National/International Results

  • Competition Year Event Placing/Record
  • Canadian Championships 1965 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1966 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1967 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1968 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1969 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1970 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1971 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1972 1st
  • Canadian Championships 1973 1st
  • Pan American Championships 1968 1st
  • Pan American Championships 1970 1st
  • California World Cup 1970 1st
  • World Championships 1971 Overall 1st
  • World Championships 1971 Jump 1st
  • World Championships 1971 Slalom 2nd
  • World Championships 1973 Overall 1st
  • World Championships 1973 Slalom 1st
  • World Championships 1973 Jump 2nd
  • World Cup 1971 1st
  • California World Cup 1971 1st
  • Moomba Masters 1972 1st
  • Benson & Hedges Internationals 1973 1st
  • Lida Cup 1974 1st
  • U.S. Masters 1974 1st

Quick Facts

  • Third man in history to win two consecutive World Water Ski Overall Championships.
  • Entered his first World Tournament in Sherbrooke in 1967 when he was only fifteen years old
  • Four years later in 1971, he won the Overall event by just 60 points to become the first Canadian to win a gold medal in world competition since Charlie Blackwell in 1953.
  • He repeated this victory in 1973 in Bogota, winning with a substantial 150-point margin and picking up a gold medal in slalom at the same time.
  • He was inducted to the International Hall of Fame to become Canada's first internationally recognized water skier
  • His father, George Athans Sr., was also a sportsman and was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame (Diving) in 1953

Canadian Records

Open Men 
SLALOM 
1968 National Championship @ 36' off 
1970 National Championship 4 ½ @ 14.25 m (34.5 buoys) 
1971 World Championship 1 ½ @ 12.0 m (45 buoys) 
1974 National Championship 3 @ 12.0 m (45 buoys)

TRICKS 
1967 Team Trials 4519 points 
1970 Canadian Masters 5092 points 
1974 National Championship 5030 points

JUMP 
1968 National Championship 145 ' (44.2 m) 
1970 National Championship 157' (47.9 m) 
1971 Team Trials 159' (48.5 m) 
1972 National Championship 161' (49.1 m) 
1973 Quebec Cup 164' (50.0 m) 
1974 National Championship 167' (50.9 m)

Boys III 
SLALOM 
6 @ 24' off

TRICKS 
1967 National Championship 4300 points

JUMP 
1968 Quebec Open 35.7 m (117') 57 kph

Men I 
SLALOM 
1968 National Championships @ 36' off (36 mph) 
1970 National Championships 4 ½ @ 14.25 m (34.5 buoys) 
1971 World Championship 1 ½ @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1974 National Championship 3 @ 12.0 m (45 buoys)

TRICKS 
1970 Canadian Masters 5092 points 
1974 National Championship 5030 points

JUMP 
1968 National Championship 145 ' (44.2 m) 
1970 National Championship 157' (47.9 m) 
1971 Team Trials 159' (48.5 m) 
1972 National Championship 161' (49.1 m) 
1973 Quebec Cup 164' (50.0 m) 
1974 National Championship 167' (50.9 m)

Charles Blackwell

The late Charles Blackwell was Canada's first water skiing world champion. And he did it in style earning the men's slalom gold on home waters in Toronto in 1953. The Ontario capital was the first Canadian city to host the water skiing worlds.

Blackwell started water skiing rather late at age 17 in 1948 but within two years he was winning tournaments on a consistent basis including the world crown and three Canadian titles. At Expo '67 in Montreal, he was awarded a special gold medal for his world triumph.

He worked 33 years for Kodak of Canada then purchased and operated Pointe au Baril Marina near his cottage at Harris Lake, Ont.

His wife Mary Lou pre-deceased him in 1991 and Charles Blackwell passed away in 1994. They had four daughters including twins.

''Dad was always proud of everything he did,'' said his youngest daughter Sandra Blackwell. ''Water skiing gave him some wonderful adventures, though he was never into boasting about his accomplishments. He taught us all to ski but never pushed, just taught."

 

Charles Seward Blackwell Jr. will forever be known as Canada's first water ski world champion.

Charlie Blackwell was a Canadian pioneer in the sport. He became the first athlete from this country to win a gold medal (slalom) against athletes from many other countries at the World Championships held in Toronto. This event was the first of three World Championships to be held in Canada and his success was the inspiration for other Canadian World Champions to follow - George Athans, Pat Messner, Joel McClintock, Judy McClintock, Jaret Llewellyn, and the Canadian Team - 1st ever to defeat from 1991 to 1995 the powerful water skiers from the U.S., who had forever reigned as the best water skiers in the world. But Charlie Blackwell was the "first" and his 1953 success pointed the way to the future.

Charlie Blackwell also played a quiet background role in the development of Canada's top position in world water skiing. He served on the executive of the Canadian Water Ski Association (now Water Ski and Wakeboard Canada) and was editor of the sports newsletter.

In his hometown of Owen Sound, Charlie learned to ski beginning in 1948 at age 17, with coach "Hump" Taylor. Within two years he was competing in, and winning, tournaments. He went on to win three Canadian championships, the slalom gold medal at the 1953 World Championships held in Toronto, and to ski in various tournaments and shows at Cypress Gardens as well as the CNE ski show.

Charlie was a quiet, unassuming man who didn't boast of his many accomplishments. A 1950 story relates that Charlie, as a grade 13 student, initially declined a trip to the World Championships at Cypress Gardens: He thought it might interfere too much with his school work. But the officials of the meet cabled him urging his acceptance and he finally accepted.

By 1958 Blackwell had to curtail his CNE show skiing when his twin girls were born. Charlie worked for Kodak of Canada for 33 years, eventually retiring from that job but then purchasing and operating Pointe au Baril Marina near the family cottage on Harris Lake. At the cottage he taught his four daughters to ski - they were amazed that dad skied but never got wet - and from the marina he took a hand in advising many more would-be skiers how to get going. "We never felt we had to surpass him", says 4th daughter Sandra Blackwell. "He never pushed, he just taught."

He would relate only snippets of his athletic prowess to his family, preferring to tell unassuming stories, like the time he skied into a boathouse and broke his nose. In 1967, Charlie accepted an invitation to attend Expo '67 in Montreal, taking along his young family, and accepted a gold medal recognizing his triumph of fourteen years earlier. This event was the first clue his children got that their dad had ever done anything 'special'.

He went on skiing at the cottage until he was in his mid-50's. His wife, Mary Lou, died in August 1991, by which time the four daughters (Robin, Carol, Karen and Sandra) had given Charlie over ten grandchildren. Sandra reports Charlie wished for 'an even dozen', a wish which later came true. But eventually Charlie developed cancer, and died March 28, 1994. Three days before the end, he told Sandra that he could never complain about leaving because his life had been such an adventure - and he was ready for his next adventure.

Jeremy Kovak

Jeremy Kovak is a pioneer in wakeboarding, which is regarded today as one of the world's fastest growing water sports. Now only 30-years-old, he enjoyed a stellar career on the pro circuit and was a responsible for the maple leaf flying highest at competitions around the world.

In 1993, Kovak became the first Canadian to win a world wakeboard title (which he repeated in 1997) and in 1997 captured the World Cup crown as well. He has also triumphed at Masters, the X-Games and the World Extreme Cup. He posted more than 30 wins on the Pro Tour. During those years he had a heated and popular rivalry with American Darren Shapiro.

''Wakeboarding is in an exciting period right now and sometimes I wish I was still competing,'' said Kovak. ''It's just getting bigger and bigger. I think the appeal for the youngsters is that it's an extreme sport and has so many variables. They're really into the sport and are also real fans of the sport. I got involved initially because I loved doing flips and doing acrobatics in general.''

Kovak was also a star on the Canadian junior water ski team from 1988 to 1991 earning the world junior crown in 1990. He still holds Canadian water ski records. After retiring in 2000, he wrote an instructional wakeboard book, which he is currently promoting and selling.

Career Highlights

  • Was World champion in two disciplines: 1990 - World Junior Water Ski Champion in Jump before 'switching' to wakeboarding, becoming 1997 World Wakeboarding Champion (first Canadian to ever win a world wakeboarding crown)
  • Was a member of the Junior National Water Ski Team from 1988 to 1991, setting several Canadian records and winning several national titles
  • 1993-1999 - Over 20 Wakeboard Pro Tour Victories
  • 1993 - World Wakeboard Champion
  • 1995 - Canadian Masters Champion (Wakeboarding)
  • 1996 - Wakeboarding Masters Champion
  • 1997 - X-Games Champion
  • 1997 - World Extreme Cup Champion
  • 1997 - World Wakeboard Champion
  • 1997 - World Cup Champion
  • was featured on the cover of Honeycomb Cereal boxes for 6 months in 1998

Canadian Records (Water ski)

Boys III

SLALOM 
1990 National Championship (Co-holder) 4 @ 12.00 m

JUMP 
44.5 m (146') 51 kph boat speed

Beth Leboff

Leboff grew up in Montreal and her family had a home on a lake in the Laurentian Mountains. ''All I ever wanted to do was water ski,'' she said. ''I learned to barefoot initially with some friends and I found it exciting and challenging. My parents hooked me up with a proper coach so I would be safe.''

She won the national slalom title in 1991 and swept gold in overall, jump, slalom and tricks at the 1992 nationals. She was the Quebec Water Ski Federation's athlete of the year in 1991 and 1992. After the 1992 worlds she went to law school and today is a practicing attorney in Fort Lauderdale. She and her husband Scott McCullough have two young children.

 

Beth Leboff grew up in Montreal. Her family had a home on a Lake in the Laurentians where they spent our weekends, and is where her Waterskiing began. Also, she attended summer camps as a child where all she wanted to do was Waterski. Beth learned to barefoot with some friends initially off a kneeboard with none of the right equipment.

Beth found Barefooting exciting and very challenging. At the time (mid 80's) it seemed to be a daredevil/extreme sport. Once her family realized she was not going to give up on the pursuit of learning to barefoot, and that Beth was quite serious about it they felt that a proper coach might be the way to keep Beth safe.

Her first coach was Steve Merritt. Steve taught Beth the foundation which led to many successes. Steve also showed her that to be a success it is not only about talent. She had to be prepared for hard work, training, dedication and focus which was imperative to accomplishing the goals that they mapped out together. Beth would travel back and forth to Florida to train when not in school in Montreal.

Eventually Beth learned to jump with the coaching of Mike Siepel and Casey Scalise. Jumping to Beth, was the ultimate although she never lost respect for the ramp and the danger it presented.

Career Highlights:

  • 1991 & 1992 - Selected by the Quebec Waterski Federation as Athlete of the Year
  • 1989 & 1992 -Quebec Barefoot Team
  • 1990 - 1992 Canadian National Barefoot Team Member ( competed in the 1990 & 1992 World Championships)
  • 1991 - Canadian National Championships - Montreal, Quebec - 2nd place overall, 1st place slalom, 2nd place tricks
  • 1991 -Canam Challenge - Jacksonville, Florida - 2nd place overall
  • 1992 Canadian National Championships - Edmonton, Canada - 1st place overall, 1st place - jump, slalom, and tricks
  • 1992 - Canam Challenge, Jacksonville, Florida - 2nd place overall - 2nd place jump, slalom, 3rd place tricks
  • 1992 - Florida State Championships, Ft Lauderdale, Florida- 1st place overall, IST place jump, slalom, and tricks
  • 1992 Narcoosee Challenge - Narcsossee, Florida - 1st place overall
  • 1992 World Championships in Thurrock, England - 7th overall and received the gold in jumping I jumped 13.7 meters (which I believe was the Canadian record). Beth also contributed to the Canadian team winning the bronze overall.
  • 1992 European Championships - Frejus, France, forerunner
  • 1993 - Awarded the commemorative medal for the 125th anniversary of Canadian Confederation by the governor general, the right honorable Ramon John Hnatyshyn

Beth Leboff competed predominantly in the US Southern region and in Canada. Her years of competition where 1989 - 1993 at which point she had graduated from McGill University and was living in Florida skiing full time. After the 1992 World Championships she decided to go to law school, but wanted to remain in Florida so as to continue skiing. Beth then started law school in 1993 in Ft Lauderdale where she met husband, Scott McCullough. Still living in the Ft Lauderdale area, Beth is a practicing attorney, wife, and Mother of Matthew and Jordyn.

Joel McClintock

Joel McClintock has been successful in water skiing as a competitor, coach, author, television commentator and businessman.

In competition, McClintock was part of the world's most successful family in the sport, which included his sister Judy, who'll also be one of the first seven inductees into the Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Hall of Fame. He learned to water ski at age three, competed for the first time at five and won his first national title at 11. The highlight of his senior level career was winning the overall title at the world championships in 1979. He competed at five worlds in total. He was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

''Winning the world title was a huge deal for me because the sport was my whole life up to that point,'' he said. ''That was my focus from the time I was 12-years-old. Nothing else mattered. Fortunately for me many other wonderful things happened to me afterwards including my involvement with the national team as a coach.''

As a coach, McClintock guided Canada to the world team title in 1991 and 1993 and was a three-time winner of the Coaching Association of Canada's Excellence Award. In addition, he authored The Complete Instructional Book of Waterskiing, produced an instructional videotape on the sport, was host of Watersports World, a nationally syndicated TV program for three years and provided expert analysis on TV for major events such as the Masters.

He currently operates Palm Beach Water Sports, a water skiing school in Florida.

 

Career Highlights

  • Learned to ski at age 3
  • Learned to jump at age 4
  • First competition - 1965 (age 5) - jump only
  • First National Championships - 1970 (age 10)
  • First National Championship Title - 1971 (age 11)
  • 1972-76, Many National Records and Titles
  • First World Championships, 1977 - Finished 5th Overall
  • 1979 World Overall Champion
  • 1980-85: Represented Canada at three more World Championships
  • 1987-95: Coached Canadian team (1991 and 1993 Team Canada won World Title)
  • Canadian Men's III slalom record- 1 @ 10.25m (41' off 34 m.p.h.).
  • Canadian Amateur Athlete of the Year 1979
  • Inducted into Canadian Sports Hall of Fame
  • Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Coach of the Year - 1991
  • Two-time recipient of Longines Wittnauer Coaching Excellence Award
  • 2002 Petro-Canada Coaching Excellence Award

He is author of "The Complete Instructional Book of Waterskiing" and has produced an instructional video tape entitled "A Skiers Guide to Excellence".

After skiing on the Canadian National Team from 1977 to 1985, McClintock retired from international competition and has since focused his time and energy on coaching waterskiing. From 1987 to 1996 he coached the Canadian National Waterski Team which won two World Championship team titles during that time period.

McClintock was also the personal coach for his sister, Judy Messer-McClintock. Joel and Judy McClintock are the only siblings who have each won World Overall Titles.

McClintock was the host of the national television program "Watersports World" for three seasons and has done live commentary at the Masters and numerous other live and TV events.

National/International Results

  • Competition Year Event Placing/Record
  • World Championship 1977 Overall 5th
  • Pan American Championship 1978
  • Canadian Championships 1978 Open Tricks Gold
  • Canadian Championships 1978 Open Slalom Gold
  • Moomba Masters 1979 Overall Silver
  • U.S. Masters 1979 Jump Gold
  • U.S. Masters 1979 Overall Silver
  • California International Cup 1979 Overall Gold
  • World Championship 1979 Overall Gold
  • 9 year National Team member (1977 to 1985)

Canadian Records

Open Men 
SLALOM 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.0m (46 buoys) 
1979 National Championships 2 @ 11.25m (50 buoys) 
1981 Liz Allan SuperStars 3 @ 11.25m (51 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 4 @ 11.25m (52 buoys) 
1992 Trophy Lakes Autumn Record (Co-holder) 2.5 @ 10.75m (56.5 buoys)

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 6350 points 
1980 California International Cup 7300 points

Juvenile Boys 
JUMP 
1973 Simplicity Open 33.0m (108') 49 kph

Boys III 
SLALOM 
1978 Eastern Championship 2.5 @ 12.00 m 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.00 m

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points

Men I 
SLALOM 
1978 Pan Am Championship 4 @ 12.0 m (46 buoys) 
1979 National Championship 2 @ 11.25 m (50 buoys) 
1981 Liz Allan SuperStars 3 @ 11.25 m (51 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 4 @ 11.25 m (52 buoys)

TRICKS 
1977 Western Championship 5320 points 
1978 Eastern Championship 5470 points 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 6020 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 6350 points 
1980 California International Cup 7300 points

Men II 
SLALOM 
1992 Trophy Lakes Autumn Record 2.5 @ 10.75 m

Judy McClintock-Messer

Judy McClintock-Messer’s numbers speak for themselves. She won world titles 10 years apart (1985 in tricks and 1995 in overall and tricks), broke Canadian records 48 times and still holds the tricks mark today, was on the national team for 19 years (1978-1996) and competed at every world championships during those years-.an international record. She also won 30 national crowns and claimed four Masters titles. Incredibly, when she retired in 1996 she was only 33-years-old.

‘’Water skiing was a big activity in our family spearheaded by my parents,’’ recalled McClintock-Messer, the youngest of five children and the only girl. Three of her brothers were on the national team as well. ‘’We were lucky enough to have competitive water skiers living close by, so we got involved in that. By the time I was nine I won my first national title. I was geared towards competition right from the start.’’

Of course with such a record, you would think McClintock-Messer ate, slept and drank water skiing. However she married Perry John Messer at age 22 in 1985 and they launched successful fitness business in Northampton, Massachusetts and started a family. That didn’t slow McClintock-Messer at all. She kept winning in water skiing, the business thrived and they had three children.

McClintock-Messer and her brother Joel McClintock were the first siblings to win world titles and they also helped end the American’s 40-year-reign in the team event at the 1991 worlds. Today McClintock-Messer is an avid runner who participates in many events such as the Boston Marathon.

 

Career Summary

  • Started waterskiing at age 3
  • Started competitive waterskiing at age 8
  • First National Championships age 10 - won gold medal Jr. Girls Tricks
  • First International competition - 1977 World Championships in Milan, Italy (Alternate)
  • First World Championships - Toronto, Canada 1979
  • 19 year member (1978 to 1996) of Canada's National Team
  • Participated in every World Championship 1979-1995
  • Contributed to Team score in every Worlds she skied in
  • Won more than 30 National titles
  • Is a 48-time National record holder, still retaining the Canadian Open trick record to this day
  • 1980s won prestigious U.S. Masters Overall and three U.S. Masters Trick titles
  • 1985 - Married Perry John Messer, started business, Nautilus Fitness Centre
  • 1985 - Women's World Trick Champion, Toulouse, France
  • 1987 - Inducted in to the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame
  • 1985-90 - Continued to compete and accumulate International honors
  • 1991-93 - Prominent player in history, helping Canada the first to defeat the U.S. for the World Team title after 40 years of competition. Defended World Title in 1993 for back to back wins.
  • September 17, 1995 - Crowned Women's World Overall Champion. Also received bronze medal in tricks
  • 1996 - Retired from competitive waterskiing in 1996 at age 33

The Judy McClintock-Messer Story

Judy McClintock Messer's athletic career as a waterskier is pure fairytale material. Born to Doctor J.P. McClintock (D.D.S.) and Joyce McClintock, Judy is the youngest of five children and the only girl.

Judy grew up in a very competitive environment with four brothers, three of whom are also avid waterskiers. With an early start to waterskiing at age 3 and a competitive career starting at age 8, Judy showed promise to being one of Canada's elite athletes.

By age 10, Judy, known affectionately as Buff because of her resemblance to Buffy in t.v.'s Family Affair, was competing and winning at the national level. There was no turning back. Judy rapidly progressed through all levels of competition and consistently came out on top, even in fields of competitors much her senior in age and experience.

Judy was showing signs of her world champion potential. In 1979 McClintock represented Canada at the World Championships. She would continue this responsibility for the next 16 years, skiing in more World Championships than any other athlete in the sport. By the mid '80s, Judy was strongly established as an International force, having won the prestigious U.S. Masters overall title and trick title in 1981 as well as many other Pan American and World medals.

In 1985, Judy proved herself the best in the world by winning the gold medal in women's tricks at the World Championships in Toulouse, France. Having reached that pinnacle that few athletes ever achieved Judy could have easily rationalized retirement. By then she had married, supported her husband's efforts to start their own fitness business in Northampton, Massachusetts and was looking forward to starting a family. She did all of the above except retire!

From 1985 onward, Judy had her hands full. She would now be a part time athlete while being a full time businesswoman and mother. And as would be expected Judy excelled at all three. With new priorities in life, Judy the mature athlete wisely focused on select goals.

There were only two things left for Judy McClintock Messer in the sport of waterskiing. The prestigious World Overall Title and the seemingly impossible World Team Title. To date the U.S. had dominated as a team, having never in 40 years of competition, been defeated in the World Championships. In 1991 history was made and Judy reduced her goals by one when Team Canada won the World Team Title in Austria.

Again, to the waterski world, Judy had done it all and this would be the opportune time for this busy and worldly women to bow out. But Judy Messer, like few other athletes, recognizes the inner need beyond the desire to win. Judy is and always has been a contributor. And now a critical part of the World Champion Team this was not the time for Judy to quit. Judy went on to be a prominent member of the 1993 Canadian Team which defended its world title. By 1995, at age 31, many thought Judy had accomplished everything and contributed generously and would surely change her priorities and not show up to perform at the 1995 World Championships.

What these people hadn't considered was that Judy's priorities had changed many years before and that in fact it was her peace of mind combined with unparallel discipline and focus that made it possible to continue to compete among the best in the world even as a part time athlete. 1995 was a year of unprecedented focus for Judy. From early in the season you could see in her eyes that deep inside she had the burning desire and more importantly truly believed that she had the ability to win the coveted world overall title that was the only fragment of prestige and honor that had eluded this champion.

Judy is the epitome of modesty. Never has she or would she talk about this being her year, but somehow, through an air of confidence that Judy exuded throughout the season we knew that she knew that it was her year. And so it was.

Judy pre-empted the World's by using the Canadian Nationals as a stepping-stone at which she managed a clean sweep with gold medals in each of the three events to defend her national overall title. Judy flew to France with the Canadian Team for a week of training to acclimatize and fine tune for the big event. Training went flawlessly. Judy was on track. She went into competition with a level of confidence that even this seasoned athlete had never enjoyed.

From her first event on the water things went great and just kept getting better. Messer was the only female athlete to qualify for the finals in all three disciplines. On Sunday, September 17, 1995, Judy Messer reached yet another pinnacle in the sport of waterskiing as she was crowned World Overall Champion.

Having achieved this honor Judy also established some firsts. Judy is the first Canadian woman to win the World Overall Title. Judy and her brother / teammate / coach Joel McClintock are the first sister and brother to have both won World Titles. Judy Messer retired prior to the 1997 World Championships. She went out in fitting glory after an unprecedented waterskiing career.

National/International Results

 

Competition

Year

Event

Placing/Record

Canadian Championships

1980

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1980

Jump

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1981

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1981

Jump

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1982

Slalom

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1983

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1983

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1985

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1985

Tricks

Gold

World Championships

1985

Overall

Silver

Canadian Championships

1986

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1986

Jump

Gold

The Masters Water Ski Tournament

1987

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1987

Tricks

Gold

World Championships

1987

Overall

bronze

Canadian Championships

1987

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1987

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1988

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1989

Overall

Gold

Canadian Championships

1990

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1991

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1991

Team

Gold

World Championships

1991

Overall

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1992

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1992

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1993

Team

Gold

World Championships

1993

Overall

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1995

Slalom

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Jump

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

World Championships

1995

Tricks

Bronze

Canadian Championships

1995

Tricks

Gold

Canadian Championships

1995

Overall

Gold

 

Records

Open Women SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys) 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys) 
1984 French Masters 5 @ 12.0 m (47 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points 
1984 Lakeland 3 Round Trick 6760 points 
1984 Masters 6770 points 
1984 Group I Championship 6790 points 
1985 McCormick's Spring Open 7170 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126'4") 
1982 Peter Stuyvesant Intl. 39.9 m (130'11") 
1987 Tournament of Champions 40.9 m (134') 
1988 Pan American Championship 43.1 m (141')

Juvenile Girls

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1975 National Championship 4 @ 18.25 m (34 buoys) 
1977 Eastern Championship 1 @ 14.25 m (43 buoys) 
1977 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 14.25 m (44.5 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1976 Eastern Championship 2840 points 
1977 Eastern Championship 3660 points

Girls III

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1979 National Championship 3 @ 13.0 m (39 buoys)(Co-holder) 
1981 K.P. British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 3830 points 
1978 National Championship 3880 points 
1979 Lakeland Open 4360 points 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1978 Team Selection Tournament 30.5 m (100') 
1978 Group I Championship 32.0 m (105') 
1979 World Championship 32.7 m (107') 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126'4")

Women I

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 KP British Masters 1 1/2 @ 12.0 m (43.5 buoys) 
1983 Eastern Championship 2 @ 12.0 m (44 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1979 Lakeland Open 4360 points 
1980 Eastern Championship 5300 points 
1981 Supreme Record Capability 6480 points 
1984 Lakeland 3 Round Trick 6760 points 
1984 Masters 6770 points 
1984 Group I Championship 6790 points 
1985 McCormick's Spring Open 7170 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1981 K.P. British Masters 38.5 m (126'4") 
1982 Peter Stuyvesant Intl. 39.9 m (130'11") 
1987 Tournament of Champions 40.9 m (134')

Women II

SLALOM

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 4 @ 12.0 m (46 buoys)

TRICKS

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 6920 points

JUMP

Date & Tournament Record 
1989 National Championship 35.2 m (106'6") 
1993 Ontario Championship 41.0 m (134'5")

Pat Messner

Pat Messner has the distinction of being Canada's only Olympic medallist in water skiing. That happened at the 1972 Games where water skiing was on the program as a demonstration sport. She won the bronze in women's slalom, an achievement that launched a successful international career.

''Being at the Olympics was an amazing experience,'' said Messner, who was coached by her father Joe Messner, a 15-time national champion. They currently run Mesle Canada Water Ski School in Ottawa. ''I wish it could have been granted official status but unfortunately it didn't work out. Still, water skiing remains extremely popular at the participation and that in large parts explains Canada's continued success.''

After the Olympics, Messner ran off a string of firsts for a Canadian woman. She won four world championship medals including the gold in women's slalom in 1979. She was the first Canadian woman to win gold at the Masters Tournament finishing first in slalom in 1978. Messner collected 18 national titles- the first in 1964- and broke Canadian records 19 times. She was on the national team in 1972 and from 1975-80.

 

Career Highlights

  • The only Canadian water skier to have won an Olympic medal - she won bronze in the women's s slalom event at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, when water skiing debuted as a demonstration sport.
  • Following the Olympic medal, she won 4 subsequent world championship medals, including the gold medal in women's slalom in 1979.
  • Captured 18 Canadian champion titles from 1965 to 1979.
  • Held 19 different Canadian records in her career.

 

Awards and Achievements

  • 1967 - Centennial Sports Achievement Award (Ontario)
  • 1972 - Ontario Sports Achievement Award
  • 1979 - Athlete of the Year (Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada)
  • 1981 - Member of the Order of Canada
  • 1984 - Induction into the Greater Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame
  • 1987-91 -- Served on the national coaching committee of Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada
  • Served on the Water Ski & Wakeboard Canada Adapted Towed Water Sports Committee

 

Olympic Results 
Olympic Games 1972 Women's Slalom (Demonstration Sport) Bronze

 

National/International Results

    Competition Year Event Placing/Record
  • Canada Summer Games 1968 Slalom Bronze
  • Canadian Championships 1968 Slalom Gold
  • Pan American Championships 1972 Slalom Silver
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Slalom Gold
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Tricks Gold
  • Carl Fischer Cup (Austria) 1972 Overall Gold
  • World Championships 1975 Slalom Bronze
  • Pan American Championships 1976 Slalom Gold
  • World Championships 1977 Team Bronze
  • World Championships 1977 Slalom Silver
  • The Masters Water Ski Tournament 1978 Slalom Gold(first for a Canadian woman)
  • The Masters Water Ski Tournament 1978 Trick Silver
  • World Championships 1979 Slalom Gold(first for a Canadian woman)
  • World Championships 1979 Team Bronze
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Slalom Gold
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Tricks Gold
  • Aqaba Interntaional (Jordan) 1979 Overall Gold

Member of the National Water Ski Team in 1972 and from 1975 to 1980. 18-time Canadian national champion from 1964 to 1979

 

Canadian Records

 

Open Women 
SLALOM 
1972 National Championship 2 @ 13.0 m (38 buoys)* 
1974 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 13.0 m (38.5 buoys) 
1975 World Championship 3 1/2 @ 13.0 m (39.5 buoys) 
1976 Group I Championship 5 @ 13.0 m (41 buoys)

TRICKS 
1974 National Championship 3290 points 
1976 National Championship 3750 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.1 4070 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.2 4250 points

 

Juvenile Girls 
TRICKS 
1968 National Championship 1200 points

 

Girls III 
SLALOM 
1 @ 18.25 m (19 buoys)* 
1971 National Capital Open 5 @ 14.25 m (35 buoys)*

 

Women I 
SLALOM 
1972 National Championship 2 @ 13.0 m (38 buoys)* 
1974 National Championship 2 1/2 @ 13.0 m (38.5 buoys) 
1975 World Championship 3 1/2 @ 13.0 m (39.5 buoys) 
1976 Group I Championship 5 @ 13.0 m (41 buoys) 
TRICKS 
1974 National Championship 3290 points 
1976 National Championship 3750 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.1 4070 points 
1977 Eastern Championship Rd.2 4250 points